Trace metal contamination in estuarine and coastal environments in China

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-16
Journal / PublicationScience of the Total Environment
Volume421-422
Online published5 Apr 2011
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Rapid growth of the economy in China has been coupled with increasing environmental pollution. The coastal and estuarine ecosystems in China are now facing increasing metal pollution pressures because of the elevated metal discharges from various sources. Industrial and domestic sewage discharges, mining, smelting, e-wastes recycling are important sources contributing to coastal pollution in China. In this review, status of metal contamination along China's coasts is assessed by a comprehensive review of metal concentrations recorded in sediments and marine organisms over the past ten years. Studies show that metal contamination in the coastal environments is closely associated with accelerated economic growth in the past decades. High metal contents can be detected in the sediments collected across the coasts in China. Alarmingly high metal concentrations are observed in the sediments, water and organisms collected from the heavily industrialized areas. Metal levels observed in marine bivalves also consistently reflect the elevated metal contamination. Elevated levels of metal contamination along China's coastal environment can increase the risk of metal exposure to humans by seafood consumption, raising the alarm for more stringent control of discharge of metals into environment. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

Research Area(s)

  • Bivalves, China, Fish, Metal pollution, Sediments