The significance of detecting imperceptible physical/chemical changes/reactions in lithium-ion batteries : a perspective

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

  • Hong Zhao
  • Wai-Yu Ashley Lam
  • Li Wang
  • Hong Xu
  • Xiangming He

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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Article number2329
Journal / PublicationEnergy & Environmental Science
Volume15
Issue number6
Online published20 Apr 2022
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2022

Abstract

The lifetime of Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is highly dependent on the imperceptible physical/chemical changes/reactions that occur on/between the electrodes and electrolyte. Therefore, reliable and repeatable high-precision detection of the imperceptible changes/reactions is extremely significant. High precision electrochemical measurements, such as high-precision coulombic efficiency, isothermal heat flow, and leakage current, can indicate imperceptible parasitic reaction and predict the practical working status of batteries and the battery life. However, the exact imperceptible physical/chemical changes/reactions inside the battery and battery damage remain unknown. Thus, high-precision material characterization techniques, such as in situ synchrotron radiation techniques in particular, which can demonstrate the structural evolution of materials dynamically during battery working are much needed. High-precision electrochemical measurements and material measurements are used to compare the two departments of a "battery hospital" metaphorically, and combining these two "diagnoses" is the best "consultation" for the battery. This paper is the first to present high-precision measurements from both levels of electrochemical science and materials science of LIBs. The aim of this work is to offer detailed and timely insight into the application of high-precision measurements for battery performance and material analysis, thus benefitting and promoting the further development of LIBs/battery systems.

Research Area(s)

  • RAY-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY, TRANSITION-METAL DISSOLUTION, IN-SITU SYNCHROTRON, PARASITIC REACTIONS, CHARGE HETEROGENEITY, CONVERSION REACTION, MANGANESE OXIDES, QUANTIFICATION, VISUALIZATION, DEGRADATION

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