The loss of halide and sulphate ions from melting ice

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journal

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Author(s)

  • P. Brimblecombe
  • S. L. Clegg
  • T. D. Davies
  • D. Shooter
  • M. Tranter

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)693-700
Journal / PublicationWater Research
Volume22
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1988
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Artificial ices of known composition were melted under laboratory conditions to monitor shifts in the relative ionic composition of meltwaters. Chloride, bromide and iodide tend to be lost from the melting ice more readily than fluoride, which is incorporated in the ice grain interior. The presence of ammonium ions further inhibits fluoride loss. Hydrogen ions cause fluoride to be lost as readily as the other halides. Sulphate is lost more rapidly than chloride at environmental concentrations (-1), but at higher concentrations (∼ 0.01 mol l-1) chloride can be lost just as readily as sulphate. The composition of meltwater may be described in terms of the mixing of two types of solutions: (1) intergranular surficial brines with a high solute concentration, which occupy the ice grain boundaries and (2) relatively dilute meltwater derived from the ice grain interiors. Deviations from simple two component behaviour suggest slightly different distributions for the chloride and the sulphate ions in the interfacial region between the brine and the intragranular ice. The melting of such systems has been examined using a simple mathematical model. © 1988.

Research Area(s)

  • fractionation, ice chemistry, meltwater, snow chemistry, snow-melt

Citation Format(s)

The loss of halide and sulphate ions from melting ice. / Brimblecombe, P.; Clegg, S. L.; Davies, T. D.; Shooter, D.; Tranter, M.

In: Water Research, Vol. 22, No. 6, 06.1988, p. 693-700.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journal