The impact of a single black snowfall on streamwater chemistry in the Scottish Highlands

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journal

18 Scopus Citations
View graph of relations

Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)826-829
Journal / PublicationNature
Volume332
Issue number6167
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

During snowmelt, ions fractionate into meltwaters, giving rise to concentrated, often acidic, solutions. This may cause transient acidification of streamwaters ('acid flush') in poorly buffered upland catchments. The chemistry of snow and meltwater can affect the magnitude and duration of the 'acid flush', particularly when stream discharge is not dominated by pre-event water. Such conditions are found in the Scottish Highlands. The most acidic snowfalls are coloured or black, and occur under specific meteorological conditions. The stream water chemistry during two acid-flush events is presented. -from Authors

Citation Format(s)

The impact of a single black snowfall on streamwater chemistry in the Scottish Highlands. / Tranter, M.; Abrahams, P. W.; Blackwood, I. L.; Brimblecombe, P.; Davies, T. D.

In: Nature, Vol. 332, No. 6167, 1988, p. 826-829.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journal