The History of Air Pollution in york, England

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)22_Publication in policy or professional journal

7 Scopus Citations
View graph of relations

Author(s)

  • Peter Brimblecombe
  • Catherine Bowler

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1562-1566
Journal / PublicationJournal of the Air and Waste Management Association
Volume42
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1992
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

The archives of York reveal an intricate air pollution history typical of a provincial English city. Evidence survives of fragmentary attempts to regulate smoke for many centuries and by the 1700s much interest in air pollution damage to York’s fine Minster. York’s mid-19th Century public argued that pollution should not be a necessary part of economic progress and the local authority realized that smoke abatement was beginning to be seen as a local administrative responsibility. Inspector Jonathan Atkinson worked within the Public Health Act (1875) to assist in keeping pressure on industrial emissions, such as York’s railway works. The application of national statutes was hampered by limited smoke control technology and by the early 20th Century some of the initial enthusiasm for council activity had waned. Smoke from locomotives, the Gas Works and laundries were a problem for many decades. During the early years of World War II industrial smoke was suggested as a screen from enemy bombers and smoke abatement activities virtually ceased. In the post-war era York welcomed the Clean Air Act (1956), but was not able to complete its smokeless zoning until 1990. © 1992 Air & Waste Management Association.

Citation Format(s)

The History of Air Pollution in york, England. / Brimblecombe, Peter; Bowler, Catherine.

In: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Vol. 42, No. 12, 12.1992, p. 1562-1566.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)22_Publication in policy or professional journal