Systematic identification of heat events associated with emergency admissions to enhance the heat-health action plan in a subtropical city : a data-driven approach

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89273-89282
Number of pages10
Journal / PublicationEnvironmental science and pollution research international
Volume29
Issue number59
Online published18 Jul 2022
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

According to the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR), a heat-health action plan should address various impacts of hazards at different levels, including an early warning system to monitor risks and behaviour enhancement to increase disaster preparedness. It is necessary to comply with guidelines regarding heat duration/intensity. In this study, we developed a data-driven approach to rapidly and systematically estimate the impacts of various heat events on emergency admissions among the adult population (n = 7,086,966) in Hong Kong in order to enhance the heat-health action plan. Immediate, short-term, and long-term impacts determined by 1-day, 4-day, and 8-day windows were estimated to identify specific heat events suitable for early warnings. In addition, underestimated risk, determined by a continuous increase in heat risk after days without significant emergency admissions, was estimated to evaluate potential maladaptive behaviours among a specific subpopulation. Based on age- and gender-specific analyses, 1D, 1D1N, and 2D2N were observed to have a stronger immediate impact on emergency admissions. 1D1N and 2D2N also showed notable short-term and long-term impacts. Based on heat vulnerability factors (age and gender), 2D2N was a higher-priority extreme heat event for early warning measures than 1D1N. Furthermore, men aged 19 to 64 had the highest underestimated risk. Specifically, they had IRR values of 1.113 [1.087, 1.140], 1.061 [1.035, 1.087], and 1.069 [1.043, 1.095] during lag days 3-5 of 3D2N, respectively, possibly due to a lack of adaptive behaviour. By adopting our approach, the duration of heat events with significant health impacts can be identified in order to further enhance relevant heat stress information. This framework can be applied to other cities with a similar background for rapid assessment. © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2022

Research Area(s)

  • Humans, Adult, Male, Cities, Hospitalization, Extreme Heat, Heat Stress Disorders/prevention & control, Risk Factors, Hot Temperature

Citation Format(s)

Systematic identification of heat events associated with emergency admissions to enhance the heat-health action plan in a subtropical city: a data-driven approach. / Ho, Hung Chak; Lau, Kevin; Ren, Chao et al.
In: Environmental science and pollution research international, Vol. 29, No. 59, 12.2022, p. 89273-89282.

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review