SUBCELLULAR CADMIUM DISTRIBUTION, ACCUMULATION, AND TOXICITY IN A PREDATORY GASTROPOD, THAIS CLAVIGERA, FED DIFFERENT PREY

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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-181
Journal / PublicationEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume25
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Bioaccumulation and toxicity of Cd were investigated in a marine predatory whelk, Thais clavigera, after being fed with the rock oyster, Saccostrea cucullata, or the herbivorous snail, Monodonta labio, for up to four weeks. The oysters and snails had different subcellular Cd distributions and concentrations in their bodies given their different metal-handling strategies and were exposed to dissolved Cd for two weeks before being fed to the whelks. After four weeks of dietary exposure, the Cd body concentrations in T. clavigera increased from 3.1 μg/g to between 22.9 and 41.8 μg/g and to between 22.7 and 24.1 μg/g when they were fed with oyster and snail prey, respectively. An increasing proportion of Cd was found to be distributed in the metallothionein (MT)-like proteins and organelle fractions, whereas the relative distribution in the metal-rich granules fraction decreased when the whelks were fed Cd-exposed prey. At the highest Cd dosage, more Cd was distributed in the pool of metal-rich granules when the whelks were fed the oysters than when they were fed the snails. Among all the biomarkers measured (MT induction, condition index, lipid peroxidation, and total energy reserve including carbohydrate, lipid, and protein), only MT showed a significant difference from the control treatments, and MT was the most sensitive biomarker for dietary Cd exposure. No toxicity was found in the whelks fed different Cd-exposed prey as revealed by various biomarkers at the different biological levels. Our results imply that metal fractionation in prey can alter the subsequent subcellular metal distribution in predators and that dietary Cd toxicity to the whelks was low, even when the accumulated Cd body concentrations were high. © 2006 SETAC.

Research Area(s)

  • Bioaccumulation, Cadmium, Dietary toxicity, Trophic transfer, Whelks

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