Short-term residential exposure to air pollution and risk of acute myocardial infarction deaths at home in China

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

2 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

  • Jian Cheng
  • Hao ZHENG
  • Jing Wei
  • Cunrui Huang
  • Shengzhi Sun
  • Dung Phung
  • Ho Kim
  • Xiling Wang
  • Zhongliang Bai
  • Mohammad Zahid Hossain
  • Shilu Tong
  • Hong Su
  • Zhiwei Xu

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76881–76890
Journal / PublicationEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume30
Issue number31
Online published29 May 2023
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2023

Link(s)

Abstract

Air pollution remains a major threat to cardiovascular health and most acute myocardial infarction (AMI) deaths occur at home. However, currently established knowledge on the deleterious effect of air pollution on AMI has been limited to routinely monitored air pollutants and overlooked the place of death. In this study, we examined the association between short-term residential exposure to China’s routinely monitored and unmonitored air pollutants and the risk of AMI deaths at home. A time-stratified case-crossover analysis was undertaken to associate short-term residential exposure to air pollution with 0.1 million AMI deaths at home in Jiangsu Province (China) during 2016–2019. Individual-level residential exposure to five unmonitored and monitored air pollutants including PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 1 μm) and PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm), SO2 (sulfur dioxide), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide), and O3 (ozone) was estimated from satellite remote sensing and machine learning technique. We found that exposure to five air pollutants, even below the recently released stricter air quality standards of the World Health Organization (WHO), was all associated with increased odds of AMI deaths at home. The odds of AMI deaths increased by 20% (95% confidence interval: 8 to 33%), 22% (12 to 33%), 14% (2 to 27%), 13% (3 to 25%), and 7% (3 to 12%) for an interquartile range increase in PM1, PM2.5, SO2, NO2, and O3, respectively. A greater magnitude of association between NO2 or O3 and AMI deaths was observed in females and in the warm season. The greatest association between PM1 and AMI deaths was found in individuals aged ≤ 64 years. This study for the first time suggests that residential exposure to routinely monitored and unmonitored air pollutants, even below the newest WHO air quality standards, is still associated with higher odds of AMI deaths at home. Future studies are warranted to understand the biological mechanisms behind the triggering of AMI deaths by air pollution exposure, to develop intervention strategies to reduce AMI deaths triggered by air pollution exposure, and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness, accessibility, and sustainability of these intervention strategies. Graphical abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2023, The Author(s).

Research Area(s)

  • Acute myocardial infarction, Air pollution, Cardiovascular disease, Gaseous pollutant, Particulate matter

Bibliographic Note

Publisher Copyright: © 2023, The Author(s).

Citation Format(s)

Short-term residential exposure to air pollution and risk of acute myocardial infarction deaths at home in China. / Cheng, Jian; ZHENG, Hao; Wei, Jing et al.
In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research , Vol. 30, No. 31, 07.2023, p. 76881–76890.

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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