Repeated use of two Chlorella species, C. vulgaris and WW1 for cyclic nickel biosorption

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

  • N. F Y Tam
  • J. P K Wong
  • Y. S. Wong

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-92
Journal / PublicationEnvironmental Pollution
Volume114
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Abstract

Two living Chlorella species were used to remove nickel from solution containing 30 μg Ni ml-1 in 10 successive cycles. The present study also examined the continued viability of these two algal species after repeated exposure to nickel. The two species of Chlorella were Chlorella vulgaris (commercially available) and WW1 (indigenous species isolated from domestic sewage and was tentatively identified as Chlorella miniata). The nickel removal percentage of WW1 cells was maintained at around 85% in the first five cycles, then declined slightly from the fifth cycle onwards, and finally achieved around 70% removal at the end of the 10th cycle. On the contrary, the removal efficiency of C. vulgaris declined from 50 to 30% during the 10 cycles of nickel bisorption. At the end of these 10 successive cycles, WW1 accumulated a substantial amount of Ni2+ (the cumulative cellular Ni concentration was 0.92% dry w.), while the value was only 0.17% in the case of C. vulgaris. These results suggest that the local isolate, WW1, had more consistent and satisfactory ability for removing Ni than the commercial C. vulgaris. Both algal species were still capable of dividing after each nickel treatment cycle, suggesting that the cells were not killed even when significant amounts of nickel were adsorbed/absorbed. However, Ni exposure adversely affected the physiological activity of algal cells as reflected by the decline in division rate and chlorophyll-a activity in both species. Such negative effects became more obvious as the number of cyclic treatments was increased. Nevertheless, WW1 cells appeared to recover from nickel treatment when re-cultivated in commercial medium for 2 weeks. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Research Area(s)

  • Biosorption, Cell division, Chlorophyll-a, Microalgae, Multiple cycles, Ni removal

Citation Format(s)

Repeated use of two Chlorella species, C. vulgaris and WW1 for cyclic nickel biosorption. / Tam, N. F Y; Wong, J. P K; Wong, Y. S.
In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 114, No. 1, 2001, p. 85-92.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review