Regulating the Capital for Public Interest : Property Politics in the Reconstruction of Nanjing, 1927 - 1949

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (without host publication)peer-review

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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2011

Conference

TitleJoint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies & International Convention of Asia Scholars
LocationHawai’i Convention Center
PlaceUnited States
CityHawaii
Period31 March - 4 April 2011

Abstract

After seizing power in 1927 amid political strife, leaders of Guomindang believed that a modern capital could be a source of political legitimacy for the new republic. Nevertheless, the dilapidated urban environment of Nanjing did not match its capital status. Hence, the State imposed an ambitious planning project, the Capital plan, vowing to make Nanjing more prosperous than London, Paris and New York. A major hurdle of this state-led urban transformation process, however, has been the requisition of land for the development of the planning project. How did the State legitimize the relocation of common people’s homes for urban development? This paper explores how the State used public interest as a reason to justify the development of the Capital Plan and the requisition of common people’s property. The Capital had not only provided the means for the State to acquire the regulatory power to control the development of the urban environment; they had also created class separation in the city. Ironically, the spatial restructuring of Nanjing, which was carried out in the name of public interest, had caused violent conflicts with local residents who lost their homes. To justify the requisition of private property, the State had stigmatized the opposing home owners as short-sighted, selfish, and obstructive to the modernization of the capital. Not only this, the State proclaimed that all Nanjing residents had an obligation to the urban development of the capital. The shift of emphasis from public interest to public obligation reflected the powerlessness of home owners.

Bibliographic Note

Full text of this publication does not contain sufficient affiliation information. With consent from the author(s) concerned, the Research Unit(s) information for this record is based on the existing academic department affiliation of the author(s).

Citation Format(s)

Regulating the Capital for Public Interest: Property Politics in the Reconstruction of Nanjing, 1927 - 1949. / Tsui, Chung Man Carmen.
2011. Paper presented at Joint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies & International Convention of Asia Scholars, Hawaii, United States.

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (without host publication)peer-review