Reduced Ambient PM2.5 Was Associated with a Decreased Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease : A Longitudinal Cohort Study

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

23 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

  • Yacong Bo
  • Jeffery Robert Brook
  • Changqing Lin
  • Ly Yun Chang
  • Cui Guo
  • Yiqian Zeng
  • Zengli Yu
  • Tony Tam
  • Alexis K.H. Lau

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6876-6883
Number of pages8
Journal / PublicationEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume55
Issue number10
Online published27 Apr 2021
Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2021
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Many countries have dedicated to the mitigation of air pollution in the past several decades. However, evidence of beneficial effects of air quality improvement on chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains limited. We thus investigated the effects of dynamic changes (including deterioration and improvement) in air quality on the incidence of CKD in a longitudinal study in Taiwan. During 2001-2016, this study recruited a total of 163,197 Taiwanese residents who received at least two standard physical examinations. The level of fine particle matter (PM2.5) was estimated using a high-resolution (1 km2) satellite-based spatio-temporal model. We defined changes of PM2.5 concentrations (ΔPM2.5) as the difference between the two-year average measurements during follow-up and during the immediately preceding visit. The time-dependent Cox regression model was adopted to evaluate the relationships between ΔPM2.5 and the incidence of CKD after adjusting for a series of covariates. The concentrations of PM2.5 in Taiwan peaked around 2004 and began to decrease since 2005. We observed an approximate linear concentration-response relationship of ΔPM2.5 with CKD incidence. Every 5 μg/m3 decrease in the ambient concentration of PM2.5 was associated with a 25% reduced risk of CKD development [hazard ratio (HR): 0.75; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.78]. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the improvement of PM2.5 air quality might be associated with a lower risk of CKD development. Our findings indicate that reducing air pollution may effectively prevent the development of CKD.

© 2021 American Chemical Society.

Research Area(s)

  • air quality improvement, chronic kidney disease, particulate matter, Taiwan

Bibliographic Note

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 American Chemical Society.

Citation Format(s)

Reduced Ambient PM2.5 Was Associated with a Decreased Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Longitudinal Cohort Study. / Bo, Yacong; Brook, Jeffery Robert; Lin, Changqing et al.
In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 55, No. 10, 18.05.2021, p. 6876-6883.

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review