Predicting intentions to adopt safe home food handling practices. Applying the theory of planned behavior

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-103
Journal / PublicationAppetite
Volume56
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

While most home cooks know about safe home food handling procedures, compliance is generally low and has not been much improved by campaigns. Foodborne disease is a common cause of illness, hospitalization and even death, and many of these illnesses are caused by unsafe home food practices. Using the theory of planned behavior as a model, survey data were analyzed. Perceived behavioral control was the strongest predictor of behavioral intentions for both hand washing and food thermometer use. Subjective norm was the next strongest predictor for thermometer use, while attitude towards the behavior was the next strongest predictor for hand washing. This is consistent with earlier focus group results for thermometer use and suggests some possible strategies for designing future home food safety messages. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

Research Area(s)

  • Food safety, Food thermometer, Hand hygiene, Home food handling practices, Theory of planned behavior

Citation Format(s)

Predicting intentions to adopt safe home food handling practices. Applying the theory of planned behavior. / Shapiro, Michael A.; Porticella, Norman; Jiang, L. Crystal et al.
In: Appetite, Vol. 56, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 96-103.

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review