A systematic review and meta-analysis of air pollution and angina pectoris attacks : identification of hazardous pollutant, short-term effect, and vulnerable population

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

4 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

  • Min Yang
  • Keyu Wu
  • Qiyue Wu
  • Cunrui Huang
  • Zhiwei Xu
  • Junwen Tao
  • Hao Zheng
  • Mohammad Zahid Hossain
  • Wenyi Zhang
  • Ning Wang
  • Hong Su
  • Jian Cheng

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32246-32254
Number of pages9
Journal / PublicationEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume30
Issue number12
Online published3 Feb 2023
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2023
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of global epidemiological studies of air pollution and angina pectoris, aiming to explore the deleterious air pollutant(s) and vulnerable sub-populations. PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for eligible articles published between database inception and October 2021. Meta-analysis weighted by inverse-variance was utilized to pool effect estimates based on the type of air pollutant, including particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10: particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm and ≤ 10 µm), gaseous pollutants (NO2: nitrogen dioxide; CO: carbon monoxide; SO2: sulfur dioxide, and O3: ozone). Study-specific effect estimates were standardized and calculated with percentage change of angina pectoris for each 10 µg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentration. Twelve studies involving 663,276 angina events from Asia, America, Oceania, and Europe were finally included. Meta-analysis showed that each 10 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and PM10 concentration was associated with an increase of 0.66% (95%CI: 0.58%, 0.73%; p < 0.001) and 0.57% (95%CI: 0.20%, 0.94%; p = 0.003) in the risk of angina pectoris on the second day of exposure. Adverse effects were also observed for NO2 (0.67%, 95%CI: 0.33%, 1.02%; p < v0.001) on the second day, CO (0.010%, 95%CI: 0.006%, 0.014%; p < 0.001). The elderly and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) appeared to be at higher risk of angina pectoris. Our findings suggest that short-term exposure to PM2.5, PM10, NO2, and CO was associated with an increased risk of angina pectoris, which may have implications for cardiologists and patients to prevent negative cardiovascular outcomes.

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2023

Research Area(s)

  • Air pollution, Angina, Cardiovascular disease, Coronary artery disease, Gaseous pollutant, Particulate

Bibliographic Note

Publisher Copyright: © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

Citation Format(s)

A systematic review and meta-analysis of air pollution and angina pectoris attacks: identification of hazardous pollutant, short-term effect, and vulnerable population. / Yang, Min; Wu, Keyu; Wu, Qiyue et al.
In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research , Vol. 30, No. 12, 03.2023, p. 32246-32254.

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review