Learning to stay ahead in an uncertain environment

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

20 Scopus Citations
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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1383-1394
Journal / PublicationInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume19
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2008

Abstract

As the work environment changes and careers become increasingly fragmented in contemporary society, workers need to ensure that they remain attractive hires to current and future employers. The advent of boundaryless careers, for example, in this era of turbulence has shifted the responsibility for career management and development from the organization to the employees. This research explores the careers of a cross-section of the Hong Kong (China) labour force and their attitudes and behaviours towards life-long learning, which is proposed here to be central to individuals maintaining their marketability and employability. The qualitative data collected in this study depicts these Chinese workers as being strongly self-motivated and possessing very positive attitudes towards learning. However, while most seemed to have a genuine commitment to enhancing themselves, stimulated by a consciousness of the growing and changing demands placed on them by employers in a dynamic knowledge-based society, the findings indicate that many interviewees were driven more by a fear of the consequences of not engaging in continuous learning, than by an intrinsic desire to learn.

Research Area(s)

  • Careers, China workers, Employability, Hong Kong workers, Life-long learning

Citation Format(s)

Learning to stay ahead in an uncertain environment. / Pang, Mary; Chua, Bee-Leng; Chu, Chris W.L.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 19, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 1383-1394.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review