Salespersons' self-monitoring, psychological capital and sales performance

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

5 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

  • Xiaoyan Wang
  • Ping Li
  • Yi Zheng
  • Ling (Alice) Jiang
  • Zhilin Yang

Related Research Unit(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1918-1933
Journal / PublicationAsia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
Volume33
Issue number9
Online published8 Feb 2021
Publication statusPublished - 18 Oct 2021

Abstract

Purpose - Drawing on conservation of resources (COR) theory and the motivation-opportunity-ability (MOA) framework, this study examines how salespersons' self-monitoring and psychological capital influence sales performance. 
Design/methodology/approach - This study uses survey data from 293 salespersons employed in China and their archival sales performance to test the hypotheses posited. 
Findings - The results show that both salespersons' self-monitoring and psychological capital enhance sales performance via adaptive selling. However, these elements are primarily substitutes in influencing adaptive selling. In addition, by dividing social capital into two types (i.e. family-based social capital and customer-based social capital), the results reveal that salespersons' self-monitoring enhances family-based social capital, but not customer-based social capital. Finally, customer-based social capital, but not family-based capital, improves sales performance. 
Research limitations/implications - This paper extends the literature on sales force management, which examines various psychological traits and their influences on sales performance. While self-monitoring and psychological capital have been investigated separately, this research simultaneously examines these two factors by drawing on resource conservation theory. Furthermore, it explores how these psychological traits impact salespersons' ability development (i.e. adaptive selling) and capital accumulation (i.e., family-based social capital and customer-based social capital), which, in turn, affect sales performance. 
Practical implications - The results offer managerial insights into sales force selection and management. In particular, managers should encourage salespersons to obtain greater customer-based social capital, which is more valuable than family-based social capital in boosting sales performance. 
Social implications - The present research is also beneficial for employee psychological health management, as it seeks to illuminate the role of psychological traits, ability development and capital accumulation. It offers insights into sociological research on social capital by categorizing it into family-based and customer-based capital. 
Originality/value - This paper extends the literature on salespersons' psychological traits, selling abilities and social capital by examining the impacts of self-monitoring and psychological capital on adaptive selling and social capital. Specifically, this study examines the interplay between self-monitoring and psychological capital from the perspective of resources conservation theory.

Research Area(s)

  • Adaptive selling, Psychological capital, Sales performance, Self-monitoring, Social capital

Citation Format(s)

Salespersons' self-monitoring, psychological capital and sales performance. / Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Ping; Zheng, Yi; Jiang, Ling (Alice); Yang, Zhilin.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, Vol. 33, No. 9, 18.10.2021, p. 1918-1933.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review