Prevention vs. Treatment in Hong Kong : Constrained Utilitarianism with a Chinese Character

Research output: Chapters, Conference Papers, Creative and Literary WorksRGC 12 - Chapter in an edited book (Author)peer-review

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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPrevention vs. Treatment
Subtitle of host publicationWhat's the Right Balance?
EditorsHalley S. Faust, Paul T. Manzel
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages363-379
ISBN (electronic)9780199919499
ISBN (print)9780199837373
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Abstract

This chapter examines the tension between allocating resources to prevention as compared to treatment in Hong Kong. The examination shows that the development of preventive care there faces similar problems, dilemmas, and challenges as it does in many other societies. Hong Kong is a Chinese society. Despite the influence of Western culture and medicine, the society is still deeply shaped by the tradition of Chinese medicine and the moral ethos of Confucianism. Chinese medicine has a long and distinct tradition of putting emphasis on prevention, and the moral culture of Chinese communities is deeply shaped, though not entirely dictated, by a constrained utilitarianism present in the Confucian tradition. The case of Hong Kong is an illustration that in Chinese societies the tension of prevention vs. treatment can be ethically resolved in a way very different from it is in many other societies.

Research Area(s)

  • China, Chinese medicine, Confucianism, Hong kong, Utilitarianism

Citation Format(s)

Prevention vs. Treatment in Hong Kong: Constrained Utilitarianism with a Chinese Character. / Chan, Ho Mun.
Prevention vs. Treatment: What's the Right Balance?. ed. / Halley S. Faust; Paul T. Manzel. USA: Oxford University Press, 2012. p. 363-379.

Research output: Chapters, Conference Papers, Creative and Literary WorksRGC 12 - Chapter in an edited book (Author)peer-review