Optimizing subjective cognitive decline to detect early cognitive dysfunction

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

3 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

  • Silvia Chapman
  • Preeti Sunderaraman
  • Jillian L. Joyce
  • Martina Azar
  • Leigh E. Colvin
  • Megan S. Barker
  • William C. Kreisl
  • Stephanie Cosentino

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1185-1196
Journal / PublicationJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume80
Issue number3
Online published6 Apr 2021
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Background: The utility of subjective cognitive decline (SCD) as an indicator of preclinical AD is overshadowed by its inconsistent association with objective cognition. Objective: This study examines if manipulations of SCD measurement affect its association with early cognitive dysfunction characteristic of preclinical AD. Methods: Cognitively healthy older adults (n = 110) completed SCD questionnaires that elicited complaints in general, compared to 5 years ago (retrospective SCD) and compared to their peers (age-anchored SCD) in binary and Likert scales. Outcome cognitive tasks included an associative memory task (Face-Name Test), a visual short-term memory binding task (STMB test), and a clinical neuropsychological list learning test (Selective Reminder Test). Results: SCD complaints, when compared to age-matched peers (age-anchored SCD) were endorsed less frequently than complaints compared to 5 years ago (retrospective SCD) (p < 0.01). In demographically adjusted regressions, age-anchored ordinal-rated SCD was associated with short term memory binding (β= -0.22, p = 0.040, CI = -0.45, -0.01), associative memory (β= -0.26, p = 0.018, CI = -0.45, -0.06), and list learning (β= -0.31, p = 0.002, CI = -0.51, -0.12). Retrospective and general ordinal-rated SCD was associated with associative memory (β= -0.25, p = 0.012, CI = -0.44, -0.06; β= -0.29, p = 0.003, CI = -0.47, -0.10) and list learning only (β= -0.25, p = 0.014, CI = -0.45, -0.05; β= -0.28, p = 0.004, CI = -0.48, -0.09). Conclusion: Ordinal age-anchored SCD appears better suited than other SCD measurements to detect early cognitive dysfunction characteristic of preclinical AD.

Research Area(s)

  • Cognitive dysfunction, Measurement, Neuropsychological tests, Preclinical Alzheimer's disease, Subjective cognitive decline, Task-specific factors

Citation Format(s)

Optimizing subjective cognitive decline to detect early cognitive dysfunction. / Chapman, Silvia; Sunderaraman, Preeti; Joyce, Jillian L.; Azar, Martina; Colvin, Leigh E.; Barker, Megan S.; McKeague, Ian; Kreisl, William C.; Cosentino, Stephanie.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 80, No. 3, 2021, p. 1185-1196.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review