Multidimensional Evaluation of Endogenous and Health Factors Affecting Food Preferences, Taste and Smell Perception

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

26 Scopus Citations
View graph of relations

Author(s)

  • M. RONDANELLI

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)971-981
Number of pages11
Journal / PublicationJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Volume20
Issue number10
Online published22 Feb 2016
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Objective: This study, by taking a holistic approach, investigates the relationships between taste, smell sensitivity and food preference with prognostic (endogenous and health) factors including age, gender, genetic taste markers, body mass, cigarette smoking, and number of drugs used.

Design: Cross sectional study.

Setting: Northern Italy.

Participants: 203 healthy subjects (160 women/43 men; mean age: 58.2±19.8 years) were examined.

Measurements: Individual taste sensitivity was determined by saccharose, sodium chloride, acetic acid and caffeine solutions and by 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) responsiveness test. Olfactory sensitivity has been assessed by «Sniffin' Sticks». Four tag Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regions of interest were genotyped. Factor analysis and multivariate regression were performed for scaling food preferences and screening prognostic factors, respectively.

Results: Increasing age is associated with decreased responsiveness to NaCl (P=0.001), sweet solutions (P=0.044), and smell perception (P<0.001). Concerning the food preferences, elderly like the "vegetables" and "fruits" but dislike "spicy" more than younger. Regarding number of drugs taken, there is a significant negative effect on smell perception (P<0.001). In addition, drugs reduce both the "vegetables foods" score (P=0.002) and the "milk-product foods" score (P=0.027). With respect to Body Mass Index (BMI), only a significant effect was shown, on sweet perception (P=0.006). Variation in taste receptor genes can give rise to differential perception of sweet, acid and bitter tastes. No effect of gender and smoking was observed.

Conclusions: Our study suggested that age, genetic markers, BMI and drugs use are the factors which affect taste and smell perception and food preferences.

Research Area(s)

  • Adult, Aged, Body Mass Index, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Food Preferences, Fruit, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Italy, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Olfactory Perception, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Smell, Taste, Taste Perception, Vegetables, prognostic factors, index mass body, smoke, sex, aging, genes

Citation Format(s)

Multidimensional Evaluation of Endogenous and Health Factors Affecting Food Preferences, Taste and Smell Perception. / GUIDO, D.; PERNA, S.; CARRAI, M. et al.
In: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, Vol. 20, No. 10, 12.2016, p. 971-981.

Research output: Journal Publications and ReviewsRGC 21 - Publication in refereed journalpeer-review