Metal-Based Anticancer Complexes and p53 : How Much Do We Know?

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

  • Samah Mutasim Alfadul
  • Egor M. Matnurov
  • Alexander E. Varakutin
  • Maria V. Babak

Related Research Unit(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Article number2834
Journal / PublicationCancers
Volume15
Issue number10
Online published19 May 2023
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

Link(s)

Abstract

P53 plays a key role in protecting the human genome from DNA-related mutations; however, it is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer. The P53 family members p63 and p73 were also shown to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Currently, there are various organic molecules from different structural classes of compounds that could reactivate the function of wild-type p53, degrade or inhibit mutant p53, etc. It was shown that: (1) the function of the wild-type p53 protein was dependent on the presence of Zn atoms, and (2) Zn supplementation restored the altered conformation of the mutant p53 protein. This prompted us to question whether the dependence of p53 on Zn and other metals might be used as a cancer vulnerability. This review article focuses on the role of different metals in the structure and function of p53, as well as discusses the effects of metal complexes based on Zn, Cu, Fe, Ru, Au, Ag, Pd, Pt, Ir, V, Mo, Bi and Sn on the p53 protein and p53-associated signaling. © 2023 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Research Area(s)

  • bioinorganic, copper, iron, metal anticancer complexes, p53 family, platinum, ruthenium, zinc

Citation Format(s)

Metal-Based Anticancer Complexes and p53: How Much Do We Know? / Alfadul, Samah Mutasim; Matnurov, Egor M.; Varakutin, Alexander E. et al.
In: Cancers, Vol. 15, No. 10, 2834, 05.2023.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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