How Machines See the World : Understanding How Machine Vision Affects our Way of Perceiving, Thinking and Designing the World

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (no ISBN/ISSN)peer-review

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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

Conference

TitleDigital Cultures: Knowledge / Culture / Technology
LocationLeuphana University
PlaceGermany
CityLüneburg
Period19 - 22 September 2018

Abstract

We share the world with machines and technology, a man/machine relationship that is increasingly marked by empathy and reciprocity, so as to gradually assimilate our perception (human vision) with the way that digital devices see things (machine vision). Machines see the world in various ways, and they share this with us and what and how they see the world in turn affects our way of seeing it. Ways of seeing also mean ways of thinking and designing that seem to meet the needs of machines. This is an approach that deliberately makes use of the plasticity and malleability of human beings to create a new world thought that is designed to be shared with the machines. The core theme of my proposal is to understand to what extent the machines’ view of the world in turn influences the humans’ perception of the world through the definition of the unconscious. While the definition of optical unconscious fits particularly well with the reality of the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, that of technological unconscious instead has somehow defined the second half of the twentieth century. However, these definitions do not seem appropriate anymore in a contemporaneity that has radically changed form, far from the human eyes and now largely invisible, in an historic moment that marks the end of the anthropocentric monopoly of vision. The contemporary individual must, therefore, begin to understand this change, these new forms of invisible and algorithmic power that pass through our culture and which embrace all aspects of human life. For these reasons I propose a new idea of the unconscious, an electromagnetic unconscious that best seems to define the contemporaneity.

Bibliographic Note

Information for this record is supplemented by the author(s) concerned.

Citation Format(s)

How Machines See the World : Understanding How Machine Vision Affects our Way of Perceiving, Thinking and Designing the World. / Treccani, Carloalberto.

2018. Paper presented at Digital Cultures: Knowledge / Culture / Technology, Lüneburg, Germany.

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (no ISBN/ISSN)peer-review