Gesture in assessed speaking activities : A research overview of oral presentations and group interaction

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (no ISBN/ISSN)peer-review

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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

Conference

Title6th International Conference of Asia-Pacific LSP & Professional Communication Association (LSPPC6)
LocationCity University of Hong Kong (Online)
PlaceChina
CityHong Kong
Period3 - 5 June 2021

Abstract

Speaking activities including oral presentation and group interaction are assessed with criteria that often include specific comments about gesture, making an overview of relevant research potentially valuable to researchers, teachers, and students. In the domain of oral presentations, for instance, we can recognize studies describing gestures in assessed expository speeches in foreign language classes (Tabensky, 2008; Carney, 2013; Busà, 2015), studies of conference-style presentations from multimodal discourse perspectives (Hood & Forey, 2005; Morell, Garcia, & Sanchez, 2008; Morell, 2015), observations of multimodality and gestures in studies of TED (García Pinar & Pallejá López, 2018; Wu & Qu, 2020; Masi, 2019, 2020; Valeiras-Jurado, 2019), and research on the presenters’ interaction with visuals (Morton, 2006; Rendle-Short, 2006; Knoblauch, 2008, 2013; Harrison, under review). Researchers hold different opinions on what, how, and even whether or not to explicitly teach gestures. Gestures in assessed group interaction are a central but understudied aspect of interactional competence (Galaczi & Taylor, 2018; Plough, Banerjee & Iwashita, 2018). One small scale study found weaker students to gesture less frequently, use a less diverse array of gestures, and engage in “irrelevant gestural behaviors” (Gan & Davison, 2011, p. 116). Other researchers have documented the role of pragmatic gestures to distribute turns and respond contingently (Lam, 2015), to make claims, take a stance, present suggestions, and introduce new ideas (Gan & Davison, 2011), and to manage interactive difficulties (Gullberg, 2014). The centrality of gestures to group interaction is evident in studies of examiner feedback (Nakatsuhara, May, Lam & Galaczi, 2016; Gullberg, 1998; Jungheim, 2013), yet empirically-informed pedagogical materials for teaching about gesture in group interaction are lacking (Young, 2002; Nakatsuhara, May, Lam & Galaczi, 2016). By surveying a diverse body of research, this paper offers an overview of the various topics, debates, pedagogical implications, and perceived gaps.

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Citation Format(s)

Gesture in assessed speaking activities : A research overview of oral presentations and group interaction. / Harrison, Simon.

2021. Paper presented at 6th International Conference of Asia-Pacific LSP & Professional Communication Association (LSPPC6), Hong Kong, China.

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (no ISBN/ISSN)peer-review