Generating ontologies with basic level concepts from folksonomies

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

13 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

  • Wen-Hao Chen
  • Yi Cai
  • Ho-Fung Leung
  • Qing Li

Related Research Unit(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)573-581
Journal / PublicationProcedia Computer Science
Volume1
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Conference

Title10th International Conference on Computational Science 2010, ICCS 2010
PlaceNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period31 May - 2 June 2010

Link(s)

Abstract

This paper deals with the problem of ontology generation. Ontology plays an important role in knowledge representation, and it is an artifact describing a certain reality with specific vocabulary. Recently many researchers have realized that folksonomy is a potential knowledge source for generating ontologies. Although some results have already been reported on generating ontologies from folksonomies, most of them do not consider what a more acceptable and applicable ontology for users should be, nor do they take human thinking into consideration. Cognitive psychologists find that most human knowledge is represented by basic level concepts which is a family of concepts frequently used by people in daily life. Taking cognitive psychology into consideration, we propose a method to generate ontologies with basic level concepts from folksonomies. Using Open Directory Project (ODP) as the benchmark, we demonstrate that the ontology generated by our method is reasonable and consistent with human thinking.

Research Area(s)

  • Basic level categories, Category utility, Folksonomy, Ontology

Citation Format(s)

Generating ontologies with basic level concepts from folksonomies. / Chen, Wen-Hao; Cai, Yi; Leung, Ho-Fung; Li, Qing.

In: Procedia Computer Science, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2010, p. 573-581.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review