Examining news media discourse on native English-speaking teachers in South Korea

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)33_Other conference paperNot applicablepeer-review

View graph of relations

Author(s)

Related Research Unit(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPresented - 11 Mar 2019

Conference

Title2019 American Association of Applied Linguistics Conference (AAAL 2019)
LocationSheraton Atlanta Hotel
PlaceUnited States
CityAtlanta
Period9 - 12 March 2019

Abstract

This paper investigates the ways in which native English-speaking teachers (NEST) are depicted and represented by the Korean news media. In South Korea, the public’s growing investment in English has resulted in an influx of NESTs. Understanding identity as an ideological and discursive construction between the individual and the broader society (Norton, 2013, Trent, 2012), the study seeks to explore the formation of NEST identity depicted, negotiated, and maintained in the language of Korean online news media. As such public narratives are populated with non-neutral discourses (Søreide, 2007), the investigation of public narratives found in newspaper articles yields insights into how certain values and attributes are interwoven in the construction of NEST identity and how the representation of NEST identity perpetuate societal ideologies.
The study examined newspaper articles that were published in thirteen major Korean newspapers between 2015 and 2017 and identified 244 articles that appropriated the expression NEST. Employing both a corpus analysis and a narrative analysis, the findings underscore how NESTs were mainly associated with the notion of play. That is, rather than highlighting the strength of their teaching ability, the emphasis was on the indirect, “natural”, and friendly manner through which these teachers interact with the learners. Moreover, whilst the preparation as global citizens is often mentioned as a benefit from interacting with NESTs, the findings reveal the notion of globalization and English learning and teaching to be limited to certain English varieties and cultures. Whilst still work-in-progress, the study will further compare the discourses around NESTs with those around Korean English teachers observed in media discourse. Overall, this study argues that public narratives serve as a site of struggle for identity construction and such media discourses place great influence on the way these teachers make sense of themselves and have an inevitable impact on language education.

Citation Format(s)

Examining news media discourse on native English-speaking teachers in South Korea. / Lee, Kwangmin; Ahn, So-Yeon.

2019. 2019 American Association of Applied Linguistics Conference (AAAL 2019) , Atlanta, United States.

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)33_Other conference paperNot applicablepeer-review