DO YOUNGER AND OLDER EMPLOYEES REACT TO INTERGENERATIONAL CONFLICTS DIFFERENTLY?

Research output: Chapters, Conference Papers, Creative and Literary Works (RGC: 12, 32, 41, 45)32_Refereed conference paper (with ISBN/ISSN)

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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgram Abstracts from the GSA 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting "The Purpose of Longer Lives"
EditorsLaura P. Sands, Steven M. Albert, Karen Jung, J. Jill Suitor, Christine E. Bishop, Jennifer Tehan Stanley, Anne Collins McLaughlin, Roland J. Jr. Thorpe, Alison Phinney, Michael Weiner, Corinne Reczek, Elaine C. Wiersma, J. Tina Savla
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages415
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Publication series

NameINNOVATION IN AGING
PublisherOxford University Press
NumberS1
Volume2
ISSN (Electronic)2399-5300

Conference

TitleThe Gerontological Society of America's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting
PlaceUnited States
CityBoston
Period14 - 18 November 2018

Abstract

This paper examines whether younger and older employees differ in their emotional and behavioral reactions to conflicts occurring in the workplace. A total of 144 Chinese employees (Mage=40.2, SD=12.4; 53.5% females) took part in an experimental study conducted in the Psychology Laboratories. Four short videos depicting hypothetical workplace conflicts were presented to each participant in a randomized order. These video vignettes varied in the conflict context (intergenerational vs non-intergenerational) and intensity (high vs low). Results of Repeated Measures ANOVAs show significant age differences in emotional reactions (F=11.465, p=.001, partial η2=.077) and conflict strategies (F=3.432, p=.035, partial η2=.048). Compared with their younger peers, older employees reported less negative and more positive emotions in high-intensity conflicts. Age variations in conflict management were more likely in intergenerational conflicts than in non-intergeneration conflicts. Findings of this study reveal that conflict responses vary by the age of conflict partners and levels of conflict intensity.

Citation Format(s)

DO YOUNGER AND OLDER EMPLOYEES REACT TO INTERGENERATIONAL CONFLICTS DIFFERENTLY? / Yeung, D.; Lam, W.; Leung, C.; Issaacowitz, D.

Program Abstracts from the GSA 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting "The Purpose of Longer Lives". ed. / Laura P. Sands; Steven M. Albert; Karen Jung; J. Jill Suitor; Christine E. Bishop; Jennifer Tehan Stanley; Anne Collins McLaughlin; Roland J. Jr. Thorpe; Alison Phinney; Michael Weiner; Corinne Reczek; Elaine C. Wiersma; J. Tina Savla. Oxford University Press, 2018. p. 415 (INNOVATION IN AGING; Vol. 2, No. S1).

Research output: Chapters, Conference Papers, Creative and Literary Works (RGC: 12, 32, 41, 45)32_Refereed conference paper (with ISBN/ISSN)