Do socioeconomic factors modify the effects of PM1 and SO2 on lung cancer incidence in China?

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

  • Huagui Guo
  • Jing Wei
  • Hung Chak Ho
  • Yimeng Song
  • Jiansheng Wu
  • Weifeng Li

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Article number143998
Journal / PublicationScience of the Total Environment
Volume756
Online published28 Nov 2020
Publication statusPublished - 20 Feb 2021

Abstract

Background: It remains uncertain whether socioeconomic factors modify the effect of air pollution on human health. Moreover, studies investigating socioeconomic modifying roles on the effect of PM1 are quite limited, especially in developing countries. Objectives: The present study aims to investigate socioeconomic modification effects on the associations of the incidence rate of male lung cancer with ambient PM1 and SO2 in China. Methods: We conducted a nationwide analysis in 345 Chinese counties (districts) between 2014 and 2015. In terms of multivariable linear regression models, we examined the modification effects of urban-rural division, education level and proportion of construction workers in the stratified and combined datasets according to the tertile and binary divisions of the three factors. Moreover, we performed three sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of socioeconomic modification effects. Results: We found a larger effect of PM1 on the incidence rate of male lung cancer in urban areas than in rural areas. The association between PM1 (or SO2) and the incidence rate of male lung cancer was stronger in counties with low education levels than in those with high education levels. The findings of the significant modification effects of urban-rural division and education level were robust in the three sensitivity analyses. No significant modification effect was observed for the proportion of construction workers. Conclusions: Male residents in urban areas have a high risk of lung cancer incidence associated with ambient PM1. Male residents with low education levels suffer from larger effects of PM1 and SO2 on the incidence rate of lung cancer. Area- and population-specific strategies should be developed to reduce the urban-rural and educational disparities in air pollution effects, which thereby alleviates air pollution-associated health disparities in China.

Research Area(s)

  • China, Lung cancer incidence, Modification effects, PM1, Socioeconomic factors

Citation Format(s)

Do socioeconomic factors modify the effects of PM1 and SO2 on lung cancer incidence in China? / Guo, Huagui; Wei, Jing; Li, Xin; Ho, Hung Chak; Song, Yimeng; Wu, Jiansheng; Li, Weifeng.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 756, 143998, 20.02.2021.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review