Deposition rates of fungal spores in indoor environments, factors effecting them and comparison with non-biological aerosols

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

  • Hussein Kanaani
  • Megan Hargreaves
  • Zoran Ristovski
  • Lidia Morawska

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7141-7154
Journal / PublicationAtmospheric Environment
Volume42
Issue number30
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Particle deposition indoors is one of the most important factors that determine the effect of particle exposure on human health. While many studies have investigated the particle deposition of non-biological aerosols, few have investigated biological aerosols and even fewer have studied fungal spore deposition indoors. The purpose of this study was, for the first time, to investigate the deposition rates of fungal particles in a chamber of 20.4 m3 simulating indoor environments by: (1) releasing fungal particles into the chamber, in sufficient concentrations so the particle deposition rates can be statistically analysed; (2) comparing the obtained deposition rates with non-bioaerosol particles of similar sizes, investigated under the same conditions; and (3) investigating the effects of ventilation on the particle deposition rates. The study was conducted for a wide size range of particle sizes (0.54-6.24 μm), at three different air exchange rates (0.009, 1.75 and 2.5 h-1). An Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer Spectrometer (UVAPS) was used to monitor the particle concentration decay rate. The study showed that the deposition rates of fungal spores (Aspergillus niger and Penicillium species) and the other aerosols (canola oil and talcum powder) were similar, especially at very low air exchange rates (in the order of 0.009). Both the aerosol and the bioaerosol deposition rates were found to be a function of particle size. The results also showed increasing deposition rates with increasing ventilation rates, for all particles under investigation. These conclusions are important in understanding the dynamics of fungal spores in the air. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Research Area(s)

  • Air exchange rates (AER), Deposition rate, Fluorescent percentage, Fungal particles, Ventilation rate

Citation Format(s)

Deposition rates of fungal spores in indoor environments, factors effecting them and comparison with non-biological aerosols. / Kanaani, Hussein; Hargreaves, Megan; Ristovski, Zoran; Morawska, Lidia.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 42, No. 30, 09.2008, p. 7141-7154.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review