Cross-cultural Small-Group Decision-Making : Impact of Culture, Language Proficiency, and Communication Apprehension

Research output: Chapters, Conference Papers, Creative and Literary Works (RGC: 12, 32, 41, 45)32_Refereed conference paper (with ISBN/ISSN)peer-review

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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of The Association for Business Communication 7th Asia-Pacific Conference, March 27-31 2007
Pages1-17
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Abstract

The purpose of this research study is threefold. First, the study investigates how and whether the self-perceived English-language proficiency of HK bilingual students affects their communication behaviors when participating in an intercultural small-group communication environment. Second, the study examines how and whether self-perceived English-language proficiency affects non-native English speakers (e.g., Hong Kong, mainland China, and other non-Cantonese or Chinese English as foreign-language speakers) in self-reported levels of confidence when communicating in an English-communication
environment. Third, the study also determines how English-language proficiency affects preferred communication channels when communicating with professors and classmates.
This study encompassed two data collection phases. The first data set was collected in Spring 2005. Teams of eight groups (N = 57) of students from the BA in English for Professional Communication (BAEPC), City University of Hong Kong (CityU) (n1 = 33) and the US, University of Delaware (n2 = 24) participated in a 50-minute decision-making videoconference. During these videoconferences, Hong Kong students needed to report on their field research findings, and recommended corporate strategies to their US counterparts regarding a decision as to whether the company should expand their operations in Hong Kong or Asia.
In addition, two sets of the survey were designed to investigate the communication apprehension of the four research groups; namely, CityU students, mainland China students in China and mainland students studying at the CityU, non-native Cantonese-speaking international exchange students (e.g., from Taiwan, Korea, Japan), and native English-speaking international exchange students (i.e., from the US and other European countries). Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed to answer the two research questions which addressed overall issues regarding the impact of English-language proficiency on their levels of confidence and on their communication behaviours. The findings suggest that: (1) self-perceived English-language proficiency is a contributing factor affecting the communication behaviors of BAEPC students when participating in intercultural decision-making meetings; (2) the levels of confidence in English-language communication is a good predicator of CA; and (3) non-native English speaking students prefer to communicate with professors using e-mail, followed by face-to-face and phone calls, whereas the preferred channels of communication with student peers were face-to-face communication, followed by email and then phone calls.

Citation Format(s)

Cross-cultural Small-Group Decision-Making : Impact of Culture, Language Proficiency, and Communication Apprehension. / DU-BABCOCK, Bertha.

Proceedings of The Association for Business Communication 7th Asia-Pacific Conference, March 27-31 2007 . 2007. p. 1-17.

Research output: Chapters, Conference Papers, Creative and Literary Works (RGC: 12, 32, 41, 45)32_Refereed conference paper (with ISBN/ISSN)peer-review