Correction and Restriction of Health Misinformation : How Presumed Influence of Misinformation on Others and Emotions Affect People's Reactions to Health Misinformation

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (no ISBN/ISSN)peer-review

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Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2020

Conference

Title70th Annual International Communication Association Conference (ICA 2020)
LocationVirtual
Period20 - 26 May 2020

Abstract

This study proposes a theory-driven framework with which we demonstrate that emotions mediate the relationship between presumed influences of attitude-incongruent vaccination-related information on others and individuals' intention to correct as well as regulate this information. This framework was built on the influence-of-presumed-influence model and cognitive appraisal theory. We tested the framework with web survey data of 660 adults in the United States which included both the supporters and opponents of vaccination. Results showed that supporters' perception that anti-vaccination misinformation had an influence on others (i.e., susceptibility) and their perception that such an influence had a serious consequence (i.e., severity) were both related to their subsequent emotional reactions, such as anger and anticipated guilt. These emotions, in turn, were associated with supporters' intentions to correct and regulate anti-vaccination misinformation. Similarly, opponents' perceptions that pro-vaccination information had an influence on others and their perceptions that this influence had a serious consequence were both associated with their subsequent anger and anticipated guilt, which further predicted opponents' intention to “correct” the pro-vaccination information (i.e., spreading anti-vaccination information) and to regulate this information on the internet and social media. The implication of the findings is discussed.

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Research Unit(s) information for this publication is provided by the author(s) concerned.

Citation Format(s)

Correction and Restriction of Health Misinformation : How Presumed Influence of Misinformation on Others and Emotions Affect People's Reactions to Health Misinformation. / Sun, Y.; Chia, S.; Lu, F.; Oktavianus, J.

2020. Paper presented at 70th Annual International Communication Association Conference (ICA 2020).

Research output: Conference Papers (RGC: 31A, 31B, 32, 33)32_Refereed conference paper (no ISBN/ISSN)peer-review