Close relationships, individual resilience resources, and well-being among people living with HIV/AIDS in rural China

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journal

4 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S49–S57
Journal / PublicationAIDS Care
Volume30
Issue numbersup5
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Abstract

The systems framework of resilience has suggested that resilient factors external to or within the individual and their interactions can contribute to positive adjustment in at-risk populations. However, the interplays of resilience resources at different levels have seldom been investigated in health psychology, particularly in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). This study aimed to examine the mediating role of individual resilience resources in the associations between marital and family relationships and well-being in PLWHA. A sample of 160 Chinese PLWHA were interviewed to complete measures on marital relationship, family relationship, individual resilience resources, and general, physical, and mental well-being. Results showed that better marital relationship and family relationship were associated with higher levels of individual resilience resources and well-being indicators. Mediation analysis with path analysis showed significant mediating effects of individual resilience resources between marital and family relationships and general, physical, and mental well-being. By highlighting marital and family relationships as external resources of resilience and their roles in increasing individual resilience factors which thereby contribute to the well-being of PLWHA, our findings support the systems framework of resilience. There are implications for resilience enhancement interventions with the aim of improving PLWHA’s well-being by including interpersonal strategies of strengthening the protective role of marital and family relationships, which will in turn facilitate the resilience process.

Research Area(s)

  • family relationship, HIV, marital relationship, resilience, well-being