Classifying elements of a typology of gated communities

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

10 Scopus Citations
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Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)520-540
Journal / PublicationInternational Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis
Volume11
Issue number3
Online published2018
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Abstract

Purpose
This paper aims to classify major elements in a typology of gated communities and develop a framework that can be used to promote international comparison of this built form.

Design/methodology/approach
The paper draws on a survey of 77 gated housing estates in Hong Kong and interviews with major stakeholders to develop and order a classification of elements of a typology of gated communities. Principle component analysis and regression analysis are used in conjunction with insights from 20 in-depth and about 70 open-ended face-to-face interviews.

Findings
This paper explores Hong Kong’s gated communities to evaluate the relationships between the four main elements of a typology of gated communities: supply, demand, features of gated estates and characteristics of built form. It is suggested that there is a hierarchical relationship between the elements, i.e. supply and demand are higher-order elements and features of gated housing and characteristics of the housing stock are lower-order elements. The paper additionally highlights the impact of definitional and conceptual drift in key concepts, such as security, privacy, prestige and lifestyle, on developing robust typologies.

Originality/value
The paper reviews the many and varied typologies of gated communities in the international literature, classifies the elements into four main groups and posits a hierarchical relationship between these elements. This paper proposes a robust methodology for further comparative research into gated communities.

Research Area(s)

  • Gated communities, High-density housing, Public policy, Residential property, Typology Hong Kong, Urban design, Urban planning