Canine parvovirus prevention—What influence do socioeconomics, remoteness, caseload and demographics have on veterinarians’ perceptions and behaviors?

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

3 Scopus Citations
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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Article number105065
Journal / PublicationPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume181
Online published21 Jun 2020
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a cause of severe disease in dogs globally, yet is preventable by vaccination. A range of vaccination protocols are used by veterinary practitioners with evidence suggesting some protocols provide better protection than others in high infection-risk situations. This study investigated associations between veterinarians’ vaccination recommendations and hospital remoteness, socioeconomic disadvantage, CPV caseload, and veterinarian perceptions and demographics. A national Australian veterinary survey in 2017 received 569 practitioner responses from 534 unique hospitals (23.6 % response rate). Respondents from major city hospitals had the lowest perceptions of the national CPV caseload (p < 0.0001). Those from hospitals with mild to moderate caseloads (6–40 cases per annum) recommended more frequent puppy revaccination – which is considered more protective – than those with the highest caseload (p = 0.0098), which might increase vaccination failure risk. Respondents from the most socioeconomically disadvantaged regions were over-represented in recommending annual revaccination of adult dogs; those from the least disadvantaged regions were over-represented in recommending triennial revaccination (p < 0.0001). Hospitals with higher CPV caseloads, greater socioeconomic disadvantage or increased remoteness did not favor two puppy vaccination protocols that are considered more protective (younger first vaccination age or older final vaccination age), despite these regions presenting higher CPV caseload risk. Titer testing to determine whether to revaccinate was more likely to be used in major city hospitals (p = 0.0052) and less disadvantaged areas (p = 0.0550). University of graduation was associated with CPV caseload, remoteness and level of socioeconomic disadvantage of the region where the graduate worked. University of graduation was significantly associated with age for final puppy vaccination and titer-testing recommendations. Graduates from one university were over-represented in recommending an earlier (10-week) finish protocol and titer testing, compared to all other universities. Year and university of graduation, and respondent's age were associated with a number of vaccination protocol recommendations suggesting that inherent biases might affect veterinarians’ decisions. Emphasis on currently recommended vaccination protocols in undergraduate curricula and more protective vaccination protocol use in higher-risk regions could reduce immunization failure and CPV caseload.

Research Area(s)

  • Canine parvovirus, Prevention, Titer testing, Vaccination protocols, Vaccination recommendations, Veterinarian perceptions

Citation Format(s)

Canine parvovirus prevention—What influence do socioeconomics, remoteness, caseload and demographics have on veterinarians’ perceptions and behaviors? / Kelman, M.; Barrs, V.R.; Norris, J.M.; Ward, M.P.

In: Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Vol. 181, 105065, 08.2020.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review