Can "Googling" correct misbelief? Cognitive and affective consequences of online search

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0256575
Journal / PublicationPLOS ONE
Volume16
Issue number9
Online published22 Sep 2021
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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Abstract

With increasing concern over online misinformation in perspective, this study experimentally examined the cognitive as well as the affective consequences of online search. Results of the two experiments using widely shared, prejudiced misinformation about an ethnic minority in Japan indicated that (a) online search reduces on average the likelihood of believing the misinformation, (b) the magnitude of the effect is larger among those who are predisposed to believe the misinformation, (c) cognitive correction is observed whether searchers are motivated to achieve a directional goal or an accuracy goal, and (d) online search deteriorates affective feeling toward the target groups of the misinformation. Theoretical implications are discussed in relation to the robustness of confirmation bias in online search and the "belief echo"in which exposure to negative misinformation continues to shape attitudes even after the misinformation has been effectively discredited.

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Can "Googling" correct misbelief? Cognitive and affective consequences of online search. / Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Taka, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Takahisa.

In: PLOS ONE, Vol. 16, No. 9, e0256575, 2021.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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