Assessment of Bidirectional Relationships between Leisure Sedentary Behaviors and Neuropsychiatric Disorders : A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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Author(s)

  • Beifang Fan
  • Xue Han
  • Kevin Chun Hei Wu
  • Juliana C. N. Chan

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Article number962
Journal / PublicationGenes
Volume13
Issue number6
Online published27 May 2022
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

Link(s)

Abstract

(1) Background: Increasing evidence shows that sedentary behaviors are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders (NPDs) and thus may be a modifiable factor to target for the prevention of NPDs. However, the direction and causality for the relationship remain unknown; sedentary behaviors could increase or decrease the risk of NPDs, and/or NPDs may increase or decrease engagement in sedentary behaviors. (2) Methods: This Mendelian randomization (MR) study with two samples included independent genetic variants related to sedentary behaviors (n = 408,815), Alzheimer’s disease (AD; n = 63,926), schizophrenia (SCZ; n = 105,318), and major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 500,199), which were extracted from several of the largest non-overlapping genome-wide association studies (GWASs), as instrumental variables. The summarized MR effect sizes from each instrumental variable were combined in an IVW (inverse-variance-weighted) approach, with various approaches (e.g., MR-Egger, weighted median, MR-pleiotropy residual sum and outlier), and sensitivity analyses were performed to identify and remove outliers and assess the horizontal pleiotropy. (3) Results: The MR evidence and linkage disequilibrium score regression revealed a consistent directional association between television watching and MDD (odds ratio (OR), 1.13 for MDD per one standard deviation (SD) increase in mean television watching time; 95% CI, 1.06–1.20; p = 6.80 × 10−5) and a consistent relationship between computer use and a decrease in the risk of AD (OR, 0.52 for AD per one SD increase in mean computer use time; 95% CI, 0.32–0.84; p = 8.20 × 10−3). In the reverse direction, MR showed a causal association between a reduced risk of SCZ and an increase in driving time (β, −0.016; 95% CI, −0.027–−0.004; p = 8.30 × 10−3). (4) Conclusions: Using genetic instrumental variables identified from large-scale GWASs, we found robust evidence for a causal relationship between long computer use time and a reduced risk of AD, and for a causal relationship between long television watching time and an increased risk of MDD. In reverse analyses, we found that SCZ was causally associated with reduced driving time. These findings fit in with our observations and prior knowledge as well as emphasizing the importance of distinguishing between different domains of sedentary behaviors in epidemiologic studies of NPDs.

Research Area(s)

  • schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, major depressive disorder, sedentary behaviors, Mendelian randomization

Citation Format(s)

Assessment of Bidirectional Relationships between Leisure Sedentary Behaviors and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study. / He, Qian; Bennett, Adam N.; Fan, Beifang et al.
In: Genes, Vol. 13, No. 6, 962, 06.2022.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)21_Publication in refereed journalpeer-review

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