A review of interactions between dietary fibre and the intestinal mucosa, and their consequences on digestive health in young non-ruminant animals

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)62_Review of books or of software (or similar publications/items)peer-review

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Author(s)

Detail(s)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-117
Journal / PublicationAnimal Feed Science and Technology
Volume108
Issue number1-4
Online published19 Jun 2003
Publication statusPublished - 25 Aug 2003
Externally publishedYes

Abstract

The maintenance of gut health is complex and relies on a delicate balance between the diet, the commensal microflora and the mucosa, including the digestive epithelium and the overlying mucus layer. Superimposed on this balance is the frequent presence of enteric bacteria with pathogenic potential, the proliferation and metabolic activity of which may perturb digestive function, and lead to diarrhoea, poor growth rates and even death. Such enteric infections with pathogenic bacteria are common in young animals and children.
Diet has an important influence on gut health, including effects on proliferation of pathogenic bacteria, and it can provide either beneficial or harmful input. Dietary fibre (DF) is a dietary component that has a major influence in this regard. DF is a heterogeneous class of components that are not hydrolysed by digestive enzymes of non-ruminant animals, and consequently are the main substrates for bacterial fermentation in the distal part of the gut. This review presents evidence that some components of dietary fibre may improve gut health, or alternatively enhance gut perturbation and subsequent diarrhoea in young animals (including piglets, chickens and children). This review reports and discusses how DF interacts with the gut epithelium and mucus, directly or by the way of the microflora, and consequently can protect against or enhance enteric infections.

Research Area(s)

  • Bacterial infection, Dietary fibre, Epithelium, Mucus/mucin, Non-ruminant, Young animal

Citation Format(s)

A review of interactions between dietary fibre and the intestinal mucosa, and their consequences on digestive health in young non-ruminant animals. / Montagne, L.; Pluske, J.R.; Hampson, D.J.

In: Animal Feed Science and Technology, Vol. 108, No. 1-4, 25.08.2003, p. 95-117.

Research output: Journal Publications and Reviews (RGC: 21, 22, 62)62_Review of books or of software (or similar publications/items)peer-review