Prof. SROLOVITZ David Joseph

B.S. (Physics) Rutgers University, 1978

M.S. (Materials Science) University of Pennsylvania, 1980

Ph.D. (Materials Science) University of Pennsylvania, 1982

Visiting address
AEB-007
Phone: +852 34428448

Author IDs

Willing to take PhD students: yes

Research Interests/Areas

 

Theoretical and computational studies of the structure, properties, formation, and evolution of solid state materials on the continuum, microstructural, atomistic and electronic scales.

  • Defects: grain boundaries, interfaces, surfaces, dislocations, disconnections, disclinations, point defects, ...
  • Microstructure: morphology, stress effects, polycrystals, …
  • Materials: 2D materials, metals and alloys, ...
  • Deformation: defect dynamics, plasticity, twinning, microstructure effects, …
  • Film growth: sputtering, evaporation, CVD - morphology, texture, stress

 

 

Biography

David J. Srolovitz is a Chair Professor in Materials Science and Engineering and a Senior Fellow of the Insitute of Advanced Study (on leave from the University of Pennsylvania where he is the Bordogna Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Director of the Penn Institute for Computational Science).  Previously, Srolovitz was a Chair of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and Professor of Applied & Computational Mathematics at Princeton University, Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and Applied Physics at the University of Michigan, and both Dean and Professor of Physics at Yeshiva University.  He also served as the Executive Director of the Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR in Singapore and was on the staffs of Los Alamos National Laboratory (Theoretical Division) and Exxon Corporate Research (Metallurgy).  He is the author of ~500 papers on topics in materials theory and simulation ranging from crystal defects, microstructure evolution, deformation, and growth processes.  He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and Fellow of the Materials Research Society, TMS, ASM International, and the Institute of Physics (UK). He is the winner of the 2013 Materials Research Society’s Materials Theory Award.   He is one of the world’s most highly cited researchers in materials theory and simulation.